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Quick Response Grant

Quick Response Grants help New Zealand artists, arts practitioners and arts organisations to create and distribute their work. Decisions take five weeks. Typically one in four or five applications gets funded.

Reward amount:

$7,500 or less

Closing dates:

23 Oct 2015

Select your artform(s):

to see grant information that is relevant to your work. Find out which artform is relevant to you by viewing our glossary

1. Check your eligibility

Benefits and track record

To be eligible for Creative New Zealand funding:

  • Your project or activities must directly benefit New Zealand arts, artists or practitioners.
  • You must have a track record of experience and success — this means you must have:
    • recognition from peers or experts
    • achieved a degree of critical or sales success
    • specialised training or practical experience.

Your track record

For: Visual arts

For a visual artist, success means at least one public exhibition of a body of work that achieved a degree of critical of sales success. This can be a solo show or as part of a group exhibition, but not as part of a course of study.

For a visual arts curator, success means having curated work that was exhibited at a gallery and that received a degree of critical acclaim. This can be a solo show or as part of a group exhibition, but not as part of a course of study.

For: Literature

For a writer of literature, success means having had published at least one work that received a degree of critical or sales success in the literature genre for which the writer is applying. This does not include work created  as part of a course of study.

For a publisher of literature, success means having previously published at least one work by a New Zealand author that achieved a degree of critical or sales success. This does not include work created as part of a course of study.

For: Craft/object

For a craft/object artist, success means at least one public exhibition of a body of work that achieved a degree of critical or sales success. This could be a solo show or as part of a group exhibition, but not an exhibition that’s part of a course of study.

For a craft/object curator, success means having curated work that was exhibited at a gallery and that received a degree of critical acclaim. This does not include work done as part of a course of study.

For: Pacific arts

For a Pacific Arts artist or arts organisation, success means an arts activity that has been publicly presented and received a degree of success in either professional or community arts.

For: Ngā toi Māori

For a Ngā Toi Māori carver, success means having been mentored by established carvers, or having completed a course at a marae-based or recognised wānanga.

For a Ngā Toi Māori weaving group, success means having a record of successful exhibitions and workshops in the community.

For: Theatre

For a theatre practitioner, success means having undertaken a key creative role (director, actor, producer or stage manager) in at least one theatre production that achieved a degree of critical or box-office success. This does not include productions made as part of a course of study.

For: Dance

For a dance practitioner, success means having undertaken a key creative role (such as a dancer/choreographer) in at least one publicly presented work that achieved a degree of critical or box-office success. This does not include performances made as part of a course of study.

For: Inter-arts

For an interart artist or practitioner, success means having had at least one public exhibition of a body of work that achieved a degree of critical or sales success, or having presented at least one public performance of a work that achieved a degree of critical or sales success. These could be either in a solo show or as part of a group exhibition or performance. This does not include exhibitions or work made as part of a course of study.

For: Music

For a musician or a music group, success means having performed publicly with a degree of critical or box-office success. This does not include performances made as part of a course of study.

For a music composer or writer, success means having had published or performed at least one work that received a degree of critical or sales success in the music genre for which the applicant is now applying. This does not include performances made as part of a course of study.

For: Multi-disciplinary

For multidisciplinary arts success means having previously delivered a work that achieved critical and/or sales success. This does not include work presented as part of a course of study.

For multidisciplinary art festivals success means having delivered at least one festival that included works from at least two artforms, of any cultural tradition. Applicants must supply accurate revenue, expenditure and attendance information about the previous festival.

If you don't have the track record we're looking for, you may be able to get funding through the Creative Communities Scheme

Who can apply

To apply for Creative New Zealand funding, you:

  • must be a New Zealand citizen, permanent resident or organisation (overseas arts organisations or overseas-based New Zealand artists may be funded only if the project directly benefits New Zealand arts)
  • cannot be a Creative New Zealand staff member or a member of the Arts Council.

Late reports and breaches of agreements

We cannot fund you if you, your organisation, or key members of your team:

  • are more than 16 weeks overdue with a report for a previous grant or investment
  • are in breach of the conditions of a current funding agreement
  • were in 'default' of a funding agreement and sent in a late report in the six months prior to the closing date for a new application.

Project timing

Your project, or the stage of it for which you are seeking funding, must:

  • not start before we notify you of the result of your application on 26 November 2015
  • be completed within 12 months of us offering you the grant.

Other funding

Your project cannot have received funding from any other Creative New Zealand programme or initiative, including the Creative Communities Scheme, our international and capability building initiatives and investment programmes.

How often you can apply

  • You can make up to two applications in a funding round.
  • You can apply up to four times in total in a calendar year (1 January to 31 December) for a Quick Response Grant, Arts Grant, Toi Ake and/or Tohunga Tukunga, eg two arts grant applications and two Toi Ake applications.
  • If we turn down an application, you can only reapply for the same project if you have written permission from the Manager, Arts Grants.

2. See what's funded

Purpose

Quick Response Grants help New Zealand artists, arts practitioners and arts organisations to:

  • research and create work
  • present and distribute their work nationally and internationally
  • develop skills including mentoring, internships, workshops and conferences
  • undertake community or collaborative projects, including artist or writer residences
  • undertake projects with international connections
  • publish catalogues, monographs, journals, books and critical writing.

What we don't fund

Creative New Zealand does not fund:

  • projects and activities that are able to be funded by other government agencies or local authorities
  • game design, fashion design or commercial design
  • arts education resources and activities that are part of a course of study
  • content for television, radio or film
  • marae restoration or adornments such as whakairo, tukutuku and kōwhaiwhai.
  • buying capital items
  • buying or renovating buildings
  • an organisation's ongoing administration or infrastructure costs, except through our investment programmes. 

Quick Response Grants cannot be used for ongoing infrastructure costs or the international promotion of New Zealand literature. Applications for the later can be made to the International Travel Fund administered by the New Zealand Book Council.

Funding limits

The maximum amount you can apply for is $7,500. Lower limits apply to these activities:

  • mentoring: $5000
  • websites: $5000 for developing a new site; $5000 for placing work on an established site.

Publishing subsidies

We provide publishing subsidies towards the costs of editing, designing, printing and distributing a publication. Maximum publishing subsidies are:

  • up to 100 pages: $2500
  • 100–200 pages: $3000
  • 201–300 pages: $3500
  • 301–400 pages: $4000
  • large heavily illustrated books: $10,000
  • children's picture books up to 16 pages: $2500
  • children's picture books over 16 pages: $3500.

The following additional subsidies are available for literature in te reo, a Pasfika language, non-fiction or for an artform publication.

  • up to 100 pages: $2500
  • 100–200 pages: $3000
  • 201–300 pages: $3500
  • 301–400 pages: $4000
  • large heavily illustrated books: $10,000
  • children's picture books up to 16 pages: $2500
  • children's picture books over 16 pages: $3500.

Additional funding above these subsidies rates may be available if a publisher can demonstrate the work is of an exceptional nature.

More in the Individual publishing subsidy guidelines (see Make an application)

For: Visual arts

Visual arts activities

Our priorities

We are particularly interested in:

  • the creation and public presentation of high-quality new work
  • creative and professional development and residencies for individual artists and curators.

We are also interested in projects or programmes of activity that:

  • are by, with or for young people up to the age of 18
  • involve the innovative and cost-effective use of digital technologies to create high-quality New Zealand work and/or to engage and interact with audiences.

Other activities we support

We can also fund a range of other activities, for example

Developing or presenting work
  • researching or creating new bodies of work
  • commissions for public artwork
  • crating and freighting an exhibition of work to tour within New Zealand
  • creating New Zealand work for exhibition within New Zealand art galleries or public spaces (we will usually give priority to exhibitions held at public art galleries).
Developing skills and audiences
  • residencies in New Zealand (the host organisation must make the application), or overseas
  • mentoring and internship programmes (the intern or mentee must apply, not the mentor)
  • workshops, wānanga, fono, forums, masterclasses, seminars and other opportunities for creative and professional development for New Zealand visual artists and practitioners.
  • initiatives for audience development.
Projects with international connections
  • international touring of high-quality and distinctive New Zealand visual artworks
  • publishers attending international art book fairs (you must discuss your proposal with a Creative New Zealand's visual arts adviser before you apply)
  • international opportunities for professional or creative development for New Zealand visual artists and practitioners
  • visits by international critics and curators that will directly benefit New Zealand visual arts and artists.
Other visual arts projects
  • community arts projects that focus on professional artists and practitioners working with communities, or that have regional or national significance
  • researching, writing, producing, publishing or distributing exhibition catalogues, monographs, essay series, and critical writing about New Zealand visual artists and arts
  • documentary or archival projects that focus on visual arts or an artist
  • organising or attending conferences.
For: Literature

Literature activities

Our priorities

We are particularly interested in:

  • the creation of a diverse range of high quality new work
  • increasing and diversifying readership and sales for New Zealand literature.

We are also interested in projects or programmes of activity that:

  • are by, with or for young people up to the age of 18
  • involve the innovative and cost-effective use of digital technologies to create high-quality New Zealand work and/or to engage and interact with audiences.

Other activities we support

We can also fund a range of other activities, for example: 

Developing or presenting work
  • researching and writing new work
  • commissions to research and write a new work
  • original writing in te reo
  • publishing subsidies and block grants for publishers
  • writer-in-residence programmes
Developing skills and audiences
  • mentoring and internship programmes (the mentee must apply, not the mentor)
  • initiatives for audience development 
Other literature projects  
  • community arts projects that focus on professional writers working with communities
  • literary magazines and review journals
  • literary festivals, or support for festivals to include New Zealand writers as part of a general programme
  • workshops, wānanga, fono, masterclasses, literary seminars and conferences featuring established New Zealand writers, editors, publishers and so on
  • documentary projects that focus on New Zealand literature or a New Zealand writer

Non-fiction projects must demonstrate literary merit to be considered.

Projects about a specific artform or New Zealand artist or group of artists will be assessed in the context of the relevant artform.

Activities we don't support

Creative New Zealand literature funding is not available for research or writing that:

  • is funded by other government agencies, eg film, radio and television scripts; and writing and research projects supported by the History Research Trust
  • is part of an education course, eg textbooks and other works created for primary, secondary or tertiary educational purposes; academic theses or coursework undertaken as part of any tertiary education programme, including coursework in creative writing
  • we don’t consider to be literature, eg instruction manuals, guide books, phrase books, do-it-yourself and how-to books (including travel guides, gardening books, and recipe books); bibliographies, dictionaries, encyclopedias and professional reference works; newsletters, hymn books and publisher catalogues.

Creative New Zealand sees literature as a broad concept that includes high-quality writing in fiction and non-fiction. For more information please see our glossary

For: Craft/object

Craft/object activities

Our priorities

We are particularly interested in:

  • the creation and public presentation of high-quality new work
  • opportunities for creative and/or professional development for individual makers, eg residencies.

We are also interested in projects or programmes of activity:

  • by, with or for young people up to the age of 18
  • that involve the innovative and cost-effective use of digital technologies to create high-quality New Zealand work and/or to engage and interact with audiences.

Other activities we support

We can also fund a range of other activities, for example:

Developing or presenting work
  • researching or creating a new body of work
  • commissions resulting in work that is ready for initial public presentation
  • creating New Zealand work to be exhibited within New Zealand, particularly at public art galleries
  • crating and freighting an exhibition of a body of work to tour within New Zealand.
Developing skills
  • mentoring and internship programmes (the mentee must apply, not the mentor)
  • workshops, wānanga, fono, forums, master classes, seminars and other opportunities for creative and professional development for New Zealand craft/object artists and practitioners.
Projects with international connections
  • international touring of high-quality and distinctive New Zealand craft/object artworks
  • visits by international critics, curators and makers that will directly benefit New Zealand craft/object art and artists.
Other craft/object projects
  • commissioning, researching, writing, producing, publishing or distributing exhibition catalogues, monographs, essay series, and critical writing about New Zealand craft/object art and artists
  • organising or attending a conference
  • community arts projects that focus on professional artists and practitioners working with communities, or that have regional or national significance
  • collaborative projects involving other arts practitioners and artforms
  • documentary or archival projects that focus on craft/object art or a craft/object artist.
  • residencies in New Zealand or overseas.

Studio-based design

We support studio-based design, giving priority to furniture and object-based design proposals. 

Funding is available for:

  • research and initial development of the new work
  • public presentation of the new work, but not its commercial production.

Other design projects

Other design projects that we can support include those that:

  • recognise and build on the interaction between design and craft/object practice,
  • survey aspects of design history and place New Zealand design in artistic, cultural or social contexts.
Publications

Grants can support the publishing of exhibition catalogues, monographs, journals and critical writing about New Zealand craft/object arts, artists and practitioners.

Your publications must have a tailored distribution strategy. We give priority to co-publishing partnerships, or projects by independent publishers or galleries that have experience in producing and distributing craft/object publications.

We also support artists’ books. These don't need to include critical discourse. Applications must include information about the design concept, print run and distribution.

For: Pacific arts

Pacific arts activities

Our priorities

We are particularly interested in opportunities for Pasifika peoples to create, present, participate in, and/or pass on their heritage arts.

We are also interested in projects or programmes of activity that:

  • are by, with or for young people up to the age of 18
  • involve the innovative and cost-effective use of digital technologies to create high-quality New Zealand work and/or to engage and interact with audiences.

Other Activities we support

We can also fund a range of other activities.

Developing or presenting work
  • creating, developing and presenting new work
  • second or subsequent presentations of high-quality work to diverse audiences
  • research and development of an art project
  • making uniforms or costumes used in a cultural performance (not buying them)
  • publication of exhibition catalogues, and critical writing about Pasifika artists and their art
  • touring of exhibitions or productions within New Zealand.

Note: If you are applying for funding for the premiere of a production, we recommend that you include up to $5,000 in your budget to make a high-quality DVD recording of the production to digitally document the work, and involve an experienced digital arts practitioner.

Creating, presenting, participating in, and passing on Pacific artforms
  • project that support creating, presenting, participating in and passing on heritage artforms
  • projects that develop New Zealand Pasifika artists and contemporary arts practices
  • projects that encourage young Pasifika people (up to 25 years) to participate in the arts.
Developing skills and audiences
  • mentoring and internships (the mentee must apply, not the mentor)
  • residencies in New Zealand (the host organisation must make the application), or overseas
  • workshops, fono, forums, masterclasses, seminars and other opportunities that encourage creative and professional development for Pasifika artists
  • initiatives for audience development.
Projects with international connections
  • indigenous established artists from Pacific nations visiting New Zealand to share their knowledge and culture
  • international tours or presentations
  • international travel for professional development
  • participating in international arts festivals and exhibitions, cultural exchanges or art symposiums.
Other Pacific arts projects
  • community arts projects that focus on professional artists working with communities, or that have regional or national significance
  • documenting Pasifika cultural workshops or fono for archival purposes
  • developing a website to create, promote or distribute quality Pacific arts or engage in Pacific arts development and arts criticism.

Specific Pacific arts activities we support

We can support Pacific arts activities involving specific artforms.

Heritage arts

Pasifika communities, cultural groups, arts groups and individuals based in New Zealand who wish to create, develop and pass on particular heritage arts can apply for funding for the following types of activities:

  • Pasifika crafts and handicrafts — for example, tivaevae, tatau (traditional tattoo), canoe-building, carving, costume-making, importing raw materials, tapa-making and weaving 
  • festivals or gatherings (such as workshops or fono) that support learning, sharing and the passing on of knowledge for Pasifika crafts, handicrafts and performing arts.
Festivals in the Pacific

Pasifika community groups can apply to attend festivals in the Pacific to learn about heritage arts if they will be:

  • attending workshops or other forums to gain vital skills and knowledge not available in New Zealand, and
  • passing on these skills and knowledge to their community in New Zealand.
Dance

Support is available for:

  • cultural performances, traditional dance or costume-making
  • devising, rehearsing and premiering new dance works (see Dance)
  • digital documentation of dance productions (see Dance).
Film and moving-image art

Support is available for documentary projects that focus on a particular artform or New Zealand artist.

Interarts

Interarts projects integrate art forms of any cultural tradition, combining them to create a new and distinct work. The result of this integration is a hybrid or fusion of art forms outside of Creative New Zealand’s art form categories

Literature

Support is available for:

  • writing or publications on Pasifika heritage arts
  • critical writing on Pasifika arts, Pasifika artists or specific artforms
  • distribution of Pasifika literature through new media — for example, online.

See Literature.

Māori arts

Support is available for indigenous links projects involving:

  • Pasifika artists working in collaboration with Māori artists, or
  • workshops, wānanga or fono for sharing ideas between artforms and cultures.

Artists working on a collaborative proposal between Māori and Pasifika artists may need to make separate applications for the different components of the proposed budget — that is, to Māori Arts for the Māori component of the budget, and to the Pacific Arts for the Pasifika component.

Music

Support is available for:

  • manufacturing and distribution costs (mainly for traditional Pasifika music projects)
  • new music recording grants for contemporary Pasifika musicians
  • researching and recording traditional Pasifika music
  • projects that incorporate Pasifika languages.

See Music.

Recording grants

Recording grants are available to support skilled New Zealand music artists and practitioners to record, mix and master high-quality audio recordings. This includes both established and emerging artists.

Recording grants are also available for the recording, manufacturing, promotion or distribution of high-quality music works that are composed and performed by New Zealand artists and that are distinctive, innovative or culturally diverse.

See Music.

Theatre

Support is available for:

  • writing, rehearsing and presenting premiere theatre productions in New Zealand
  • touring a theatre production in New Zealand and internationally
  • digital documentation of theatre productions
  • skills workshops run by experienced directors or producers.

For more information, see Theatre.

For: Ngā toi Māori

Ngā Toi Māori activities

Our priorities

We are particularly interested in activities that support people to learn tā moko, tārai waka (especially ocean voyaging and navigation) and traditional Māori games. Examples include publications, learning wānanga and wānanga tohunga (experts’ symposiums), and mentoring.

We are also interested in projects or programmes of activity that:

  • are by, with or for young people up to the age of 18
  • involve the innovative and cost-effective use of digital technologies to create high-quality New Zealand work and/or to engage and interact with audiences.

Other activities we support

We can also fund a range of other activities, for example:

Developing or presenting work
  • the creation, development and presentation of new New Zealand work
  • commissions resulting in works that are ready for an initial public presentation 
  • exhibiting Māori work within New Zealand
  • rehearsing and presenting premiere theatre and dance productions to New Zealand audiences
  • touring of theatre or dance or music productions within New Zealand 
  • new recordings
  • literary publishing 

Note: If you are applying for funding for the premiere of a New Zealand music production, we recommend that you include up to $5,000 in your budget to make a high-quality DVD recording of the production to digitally document the work, and involve an experienced digital arts practitioner.

Developing skills and audiences
  • development of Māori artists and their work across all forms of contemporary arts practice, including theatre, music, dance, literature,visual arts, rāranga, whakairo, media arts, sculpture, painting, clay, ceramics, fibre, jewellery, printmaking, photography, drawing, and installation
  • mentoring and internships (applications must be made by mentees. Not mentors)
  • workshops, wānanga, fono, forums, masterclasses, seminars and other opportunities for creative and professional development for indigenous and Māori artists and practitioners
  • initiatives for audience development.
Projects with international connections
  • international tours or presentations
  • international opportunities for professionalor creative development for Māori artists and practitioners.
Other Ngā Toi Māori projects
  • community arts projects that focus on professional artists and practitioners working with communities, or that have regional or national significance
  • publication of exhibition catalogues and critical writing about Māori artists and their art
  • indigenous links, such as Māori artists working in collaboration with indigenous people of the Pacific Islands and other nations
  • documentary or archival projects that focus on Ngā toi Māori or artists
  • residencies (New Zealand residencies applications must be made by the host organisation).
Examples of cultural arts practices that may be supported
  • marae arts: wānanga that pass on the knowledge and skills of traditional Māori marae arts, including:
    • karanga, whaikōrero, te reo Māori, mōteatea and pao
    • the weaving of whāriki and whatukākahu
  • waka
    • creation of waka
    • artistic adornment of traditional waka
  • te reo Māori: projects that promote and strengthen the use of te reo, including:
    • books
    • recordings, for example of songs, stories, kīwaha and pepeha
    • theatre productions
    • wānanga reo.
For: Theatre

Theatre activities

Our priorities

We are particularly interested in high-quality work that engages new and/or diverse audiences.

We are also interested in projects or programmes of activity that:

  • are by, with or for young people up to the age of 18
  • involve the innovative and cost-effective use of digital technologies to create high-quality New Zealand work and/or to engage and interact with audiences.

Other activities we support

We can also fund a range of other activities, for example.

Developing or presenting work
  • writing a play script
  • rehearsing and presenting New Zealand theatre works to New Zealand audiences
  • workshops, wānanga or fono to develop a production concept
  • devising theatre productions
  • touring a theatre production within New Zealand 
  • creating theatre productions using digital and/or film-based skills and technologies.

Note: If you are applying for funding for the premiere of a New Zealand theatre production, we recommend that you include up to $5,000 in your budget to make a high-quality DVD recording of the production to digitally document the work, and involve an experienced digital arts practitioner.

Developing skills and audiences
  • mentoring and internship programmes (the mentee must apply, not the mentor)
  • residencies for established theatre practitioners in New Zealand (the host organisation must make the application), or overseas
  • workshops, wānanga, fono, forums, masterclasses, seminars and other opportunities for creative and professional development for New Zealand producers, directors, playwrights, actors, theatre designers and technicians
  • initiatives for audience development, ie engaging with audiences to maintain an existing audience and/or develop a new audience.
Projects with international connections
  • international opportunities for creative or professional development for an established New Zealand director, playwright, producer, actor, theatre designer or technician
  • international touring of a New Zealand theatre production
  • visits by international theatre practitioners that will directly benefit New Zealand theatre.
Other theatre projects
  • community arts projects that focus on professional theatre artists and practitioners working with communities, or that have regional or national significance
  • researching, writing and publishing critical writing about New Zealand theatre
  • documentary projects that focus on New Zealand theatre or a theatre practitioner or organisation
  • developing theatre-related websites.

International production costs not supported

We do not fund production costs for presenting New Zealand theatre by an international company for an international audience.

For: Dance

Dance activities

Our priorities

We are particularly interested in dance groups and individuals undertaking high-quality creative development and/or presentation projects.  

We are also interested in projects or programmes of activity that:

  • are by, with or for young people up to the age of 18.
  • involve the innovative and cost-effective use of digital technologies to create high-quality New Zealand work and/or to engage and interact with audiences.

Other activities we support

We can also fund a range of other activities, for example:

Developing or presenting work
  • commissions to research, develop and present new work
  • creating a dance work using new media, digital arts or film-based skills and technologies
  • rehearsing and presenting New Zealand dance works to New Zealand audiences
  • workshops, wānanga or fono to develop production concepts.

Note: If you are applying for funding for the premiere of a New Zealand dance production, we recommend that you include up to $5,000 in your budget to make a high-quality DVD recording of the production to digitally document the work, and involve an experienced digital arts practitioner.

Developing skills and audiences
  • mentoring and internship programmes (the mentee must apply, not the mentor)
  • residencies in New Zealand or overseas
  • workshops, wānanga, fono, forums, masterclasses, seminars and other opportunities for creative and/or professional development for New Zealand producers, choreographers, dancers, dance practitioners and technicians
  • initiatives for audience development.
Projects with international connections
  • international opportunities for creative and/or professional development for a New Zealand choreographer, dancer, dance practitioner,producer or technician
  • international touring of distinctive, high quality New Zealand dance works
  • visits by international practitioners that will directly benefit New Zealand dance and dancers.
Other dance projects
  • community arts projects that focus on professional dancers and practitioners working with communities, or that have regional or national significance
  • residencies in New Zealand or overseas
  • documentary or archival projects that focus on dance or a particular dance practitioner or organisation
  • researching, writing and publishing critical writing about New Zealand dance
  • website development projects that create, promote or distribute quality New Zealand dance, or engage in dance development and criticism.

International production costs not supported

We do not fund production costs for presenting New Zealand dance by an international company for an international audience.

For: Inter-arts

Interarts activities

Interarts projects integrate artforms of any cultural tradition, combining them to create a new and distinct work. The result of this integration is a hybrid or fusion of artforms outside of Creative New Zealand’s artform categories.

Our priorities

We are particularly interested in:

  • collaborative projects, including residencies
  • well-developed proposals for research into new areas or ways of working.

We are also interested in projects or programmes of activity that:

  • are by, with or for young people up to the age of 18
  • involve the innovative and cost-effective use of digital technologies to create high-quality New Zealand work and/or to engage and interact with audiences.

Other activities we support

We can also fund a range of other activities, for example:

Developing or presenting work
  • researching, creating and presenting interarts works
  • rehearsing and presenting a premiere interarts production to New Zealand audiences
  • commissions resulting in works that are ready for an initial public presentation
  • workshops, wānanga, or fono to develop a concept
  • touring interarts projects within New Zealand.
Developing skills and audiences
  • workshops, wānanga, fono, forums, masterclasses, seminars and other opportunities for creative and professional development for New Zealand interarts artists and practitioners
  • initiatives for audience development.
Projects with international connections
  • international opportunities for creative and professional development for New Zealand interarts practitioners
  • international touring of a distinctive, high quality New Zealand interarts work
  • visits by international practitioners or critics that will directly benefit New Zealand interarts practice.
Other inter-arts projects
  • residencies in New Zealand and overseas
  • community arts projects that focus on professional artists and practitioners working with communities, or that have regional or national significance
  • researching, writing and publishing critical writing about New Zealand interarts practice.
For: Music

Music activities

Our priorities

We are particularly interested in high-quality New Zealand work that will receive multiple live performances and engage new and/or diverse audiences.

We are also interested in projects or programmes of activity that:

  • are by, with or for young people up to the age of 18
  • involve the innovative and cost-effective use of digital technologies to create high-quality New Zealand work and/or to engage and interact with audiences

Other activities we support

We can also fund a range of other activities, for example:

Developing or presenting work
  • creating new music work
  • new recordings of original high-quality New Zealand music except where the main purpose is to use the recording to support a future domestic or international tour, a live or digitally mediated performance, or promotion activity.
  • commissions of new music or sound work (including composer's fees)
  • residencies in New Zealand (the host organisation must make the application), or overseas for New Zealand composers to create new work
  • touring or presenting in New Zealand or internationally
  • publication of music scores by New Zealand composers.

Note: If you are applying for funding for the premiere of a New Zealand music production, we recommend that you include up to $5,000 in your budget to make a high-quality DVD recording of the production to digitally document the work, and involve an experienced digital arts practitioner.

Developing skills and audiences
  • mentoring programmes (the mentee must apply, not the mentor)
  • workshops, wānanga, fono, masterclasses, seminars, conferences and for creative and professional development for New Zealand composers, musicians and music practitioners
  • competitions with a separate professional-development component or a significant focus on developing new audiences (NB: funding cannot be used for competition prizes)
  • international professional-development opportunities for composers or performers
  • initiatives for audience development.
Community projects
  • community arts projects that focus on professional musicians working with communities, or that have regional or national significance.
Music criticism and documentaries
  • publication of monographs, essay series, journals, music scores and critical writing about music from New Zealand
  • writers’ fees for new and original work contributing to critical discourse on music from New Zealand
  • documentary or archival projects that focus on music from New Zealand or a New Zealand practitioner.

Activities music funding does not support

Music funding cannot be used for:

  • music videos intended for broadcast on any platform
  • postgraduate study overseas, except through the Jack McGill, Butland, Edwin Carr and New Zealand/Aotearoa Scholarships
  • manufacturing and distribution costs of a recording project where these costs would be met mainly by income from retail or online sales or from a record company
  • recording project that contains material that has the potential to connect with a large audience on broadcast or digital platforms — that is, radio, music television, or online
  • typesetting fees for score and parts
  • projects that have received funding from, or that meet the criteria of, another government organisation
  • production costs for presenting New Zealand music by an international company for an international audience.

Other support for contemporary popular New Zealand music

Check which government organisation funds your type of project.

Live perfomance

Creative New Zealand funds:

  • New Zealand tours
  • international performances
  • making recordings to support live performance and promotion.
Broadcast and online

NZ On Air funds:

  • single tracks
  • making music videos
  • music promotion.

Te Māngai Pāho funds:

  • recording music in Te Reo Maori for iwi radio.
Industry support and growth

New Zealand Music Commission funds:

  • increasing expertise
  • music education and engagement
  • interational market development.

Creative New Zealand, NZ on Air and the New Zealand Music Commission share information on applications to ensure there is no duplication of funding.

For: Multi-disciplinary

Multidisciplinary arts

Our priorities

We are particularly interested in projects or programmes of activity that:

  • are for, by, or with young people up to the age of 18
  • involve the innovative and cost-effective use of digital technologies to create high-quality New Zealand work and/or to engage and interact with audiences.

Other activities we support

Our multidisciplinary category includes festivals. Multidisciplinary arts festivals must take place in a defined area or region over a designated period of time. They must involve a programme of arts events and activities that feature at least two different artforms, of any cultural tradition.

We fund these festivals to do the following:

  • presentation of new or remounted excellent and innovative New Zealand art and work, including contemporary Maori and Pacific arts.
  • community arts projects and events
  • presentation and transmission of Maori and Pacific heritage arts
  • commissioning, co-production and/or development of small-scale innovative work.

3. Make an application

Downloads (application forms and criteria)

How to apply

Information on how to apply coming soon.

How to make a strong application

To make a strong application:

  • if there is an application guide, read it carefully
  • use our glossary to check the meaning of the terms we use.

Content to include

  • Clearly explain your project idea and what will be achieved.
  • Describe how your project will achieve the Creative New Zealand strategic outcome you selected.
  • Describe what a successful project will look like (how you will evaluate its success).
  • Demonstrate how you'll compete the project in the timeframe. A timeline or production schedule may be useful.
  • Identify the key people and their experience.
  • Provide detailed financial information that is accurate and relevant.
  • Provide detailed itineraries if applicable: when, where, who and why.
  • Provide confirmation of venues if possible.

Support material

Ensure that:

  • you provide brief, recent and relevant artistic support material
  • audio and video support material is of good quality and accessible
  • you provide up to three up-to-date relevant letters of support, with one preferably from someone not directly involved with your project. We cannot consider letters of support from Creative New Zealand staff or members of the Arts Council. 

Evidence of demand

Evidence of demand can strengthen your application. Examples include:

  • box-office income or recording sales
  • fees to be paid by practitioners enrolled in a professional-development course
  • performance or appearance fees being paid by venues, presenters or exhibitors.

4. Assessing applications

Assessment process

Applications are assessed by Creative New Zealand staff. Pasifika or Māori staff are involved in assessing Pacific and Māori arts applications.

Assessment criteria

Match with our goals

We assess how closely the results of your proposed project match the long-term goal (strategic outcome) you selected as most relevant to your project, ie how well it achieves one of the following:

  • New Zealanders participate in the arts
  • High-quality New Zealand art is developed
  • New Zealanders experience high-quality arts
  • New Zealand arts gain international success

General arts funding

If relevant, we consider the cultural diversity of your proposed activities.

Pacific arts funding

To apply for Pacfic arts funding: 

  • key creative personnel must be New Zealand citizens or residents of Pacific Island heritage
  • proposed activities must be governed or managed by New Zealand citizens of Pacific Island heritage
  • the application much explain how kaupapa Pasifika will be evident in the practice and results of your proposed activities

Māori arts funding

To apply for Māori Arts funding projects must be by Māori, for Aotearoa and the world. This means:

  • applicants must be of Māori descent or the proposed activity must be managed or directed by Māori
  • organisations must be owned and managed by people of Māori descent. If the organisation is applying for funding on behalf of another person, that other person must also be of Māori descent.
  • applicants must explain how Mātauranga Māori will be evident in the practice and results of their proposed activities.

Nominate a peer assessor

External peer assessors are asked to evaluate a range of applications made to Creative New Zealand’s funding programmes and initiatives against specific criteria.

Peer Assessor nomination form (doc 167KB)

Peer Assessor terms and conditions (pdf 259KB)

5. Notification of results

Five weeks after the closing date, we notify all applicants of the results by email. 

We also list successful applicants at who got funded

If you are successful, we will contact you about your payment schedule and reporting requirements.

6. On completion

A project completion report is required within 12 weeks of the project end date using the report template. To be considered for further funding, your report needs to be submitted on time.

Project Completion Report template (pdf 840KB)

Project completion report - request for extension (pdf 219KB)

7. Who to contact

For more information or advice:

For: Visual arts

Senior Arts Adviser — Visual Arts
Kate Montgomery
(04) 498 0732
kate.montgomery@creativenz.govt.nz

Arts Adviser  Craft/Object and Visual Arts
Humphrey Tait
(09) 365 1416 
humphrey.tait@creativenz.govt.nz

For: Literature

(Acting) Senior Arts Adviser - Literature
Amy Mansfield
Phone: (09) 373 3077
Email: amy.mansfield@creativenz.govt.nz

or

Manager Arts Grants and Creative Communities Scheme
Raewyn Bright
raewyn.bright@creativenz.govt.nz
09 373 3478

For: Craft/object

Arts Adviser — Craft/Object and Visual Arts
Humphrey Tait 
(09) 365 1416
humphrey.tait@creativenz.govt.nz

For: Pacific arts

Senior Arts Adviser — Pacific Arts
Makerita Urale
(04) 498 0729
makerita.urale@creativenz.govt.nz

For: Ngā toi Māori

Arts Adviser — Ngā Toi Māori
Tumarangai Sciascia
(09) 365 1417
tumarangai.sciascia@creativenz.govt.nz

For: Theatre

Senior Arts Adviser — Theatre
Catherine Nola
(09) 373 3090
catherine.nola@creativenz.govt.nz

Arts Adviser — Theatre
Simon Vincent
(09) 926 5481
simon.vincent@creativenz.govt.nz

For: Dance

Senior Arts Adviser — Dance, Interarts and Multidisciplinary 
Rose Campbell
(04) 4980740
rose.campbell@creativenz.govt.nz

For: Inter-arts

Senior Arts Adviser — Dance, Interarts and Multidisciplinary 
Rose Campbell
(04) 4980740
rose.campbell@creativenz.govt.nz

For: Music

Arts Adviser — Music
Lee Martelli 
(09) 373 3091
lee.martelli@creativenz.govt.nz

For: Multi-disciplinary

Senior Arts Adviser — Dance, Interarts and Multidisciplinary 
Rose Campbell
(04) 4980740
rose.campbell@creativenz.govt.nz